Shio (Salt) Ramen 塩ラーメン

Shio (Salt) Ramen 塩ラーメン

Yes I know it has been quite a long time since my last post. I was kind of in a funk after the holidays and couldn’t get into my recipe groove. I was blaming the holidays but it’s already March so I don’t think I can use that excuse anymore. Another problem was I couldn’t decide what recipe to post next but then I was inspired by a bowl of Shio Ramen while experimenting at home. I thought this is it! I had to share this recipe with all of you. Yes this Shio Ramen brought Lovely Lanvin’s groove back.

I am having my first Ramen cooking class at Nikkei Horizons in Seattle this month and that inspired me to test a new Shio Ramen recipe. I have a Shio Ramen recipe on my blog that I posted when I first started my blog that is very basic. Since then I’ve learned much more about Ramen and about Ramen Tare. I wanted to post a Shio Ramen recipe using a Shio Tare. Tare is the soul of the ramen and determines the type of ramen you are making. This flavor mix (pronounced ta-REH) is the majority of your broth’s flavor. Every Ramen shop has their signature Tare for each type of Ramen they prepare. It’s basically the secret sauce for a Ramen Chef.

When you first look at all the components of this recipe you’ll think it looks pretty complicated but it really isn’t. Don’t be intimidated! Everything can be made a day or two ahead of time so just plan a couple days ahead or make it a weekend cooking project. You can use store bought chicken broth and instant Dashi but I don’t recommend it. You will have to adjust the Tare seasonings if you don’t use homemade plus it will taste so much better if you make it yourself.

I really hope you try to make this Shio Ramen at home and love it as much as I do.

Shio Ramen Recipe ~ Serves 4

My Chicken Stock for Shio Ramen

Ingredients:

4 pound whole chicken or cut up pieces
Coarse Sea Salt (I prefer Maldon)
1 large onion, peeled & cut in half
1 2-inch piece fresh Ginger peeled
1 head of garlic cut in half lengthwise (no need to peel)
Enough cold water to cover the chicken

Directions:

You can make the Stock, Dashi & Tare 1-2 days ahead

Salt the chicken all over, inside and out, with coarse sea salt. Place chicken uncovered in the refrigerator at least 12 hours or overnight. The next day place Chicken and vegetables in a large stock pot with enough cold water to cover the chicken. Cook on high heat until you begin to see bubbles on the surface of the liquid. Turn heat down to low so that stock maintains a low, gentle simmer. Skim the scum from the stock with a spoon or fine mesh strainer every 10 to 15 minutes for the first hour of cooking. Simmer for approximately 2 hours.

Strain stock through a fine mesh strainer into a large container. You can store in container with lid in refrigerator for 2 to 3 days or in freezer for up to 3 months.

Easy Katsuo Kombu Dashi:

4 cups Water
1 4 x 4 inch piece of Kombu (Kelp)
1 1/2 cups, or one big handful, of lightly packed dried Katsuobushi (Bonito flakes)

Combine the Kombu and water in a pot over medium-low heat. The water should be approaching a boil after about 20 minutes (adjust the heat if the water looks like it’s coming to a boil too soon or too slowly). Once the water comes to a boil, immediately turn off heat and remove the Kombu.

Add the dried bonito flakes all at once. Wait until they absorb the water and sink to the bottom of the pot, about 20-30 minutes.

Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve (You can also line a regular strainer with two layers of cheesecloth or paper towels). Do not squeeze the excess liquid from the bonito flakes, this will make the Dashi cloudy and bitter.

Note: Dashi is best used the same day but it may be kept in the refrigerator for up to three days and can be frozen for up to two months. I like to freeze leftover Dashi in ice cube trays.

Tare for Shio Ramen (the flavor base for the Ramen)

2 Tablespoons Maldon Sea Salt (or your favorite sea salt)
2 Tablespoons Sake
1 Tablespoon Mirin
1/2 teaspoon Sugar
2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
1/4 teaspoon Soy Sauce

Combine all of the ingredients in a small bowl and mix thoroughly. Set aside.

Soft Boiled Eggs
2 Large Eggs

Bring a medium pot of water to a boil. Carefully add eggs one at a time and gently boil for 7 minutes. Drain eggs and transfer to a bowl of ice water to stop cooking. Let cool. Peel and set aside.

Marinated Scallions

3 bunches of Scallions (white parts and light green parts), finely chopped diagonally, rinsed thoroughly in cold water and dried
2 Tablespoons Sesame Oil
1 teaspoon Sea Salt
1/2 teaspoon Soy Sauce
1/2 teaspoon Sugar
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground Black Pepper

Thoroughly mix all of the ingredients above in a bowl. Set aside.

For the Shio Ramen Soup

5 cups of Chicken Stock
3 Cups of Katsuo Kombu Dashi
Shio Tare

Combine all ingredients in a large pot making sure all of the Tare ingredients dissolve in the soup.

Keep warm on the stove until noodles are boiled and ready to serve.

Ramen ingredients and toppings:

4 packages of fresh ramen noodles (I like the Sun brand) or dried
Shio Ramen Soup (Recipes above)
2 large soft boiled eggs, sliced in half (cooking method above)
Marinated Scallions (recipe above)
2 toasted nori sheets, cut in quarters
Chili oil (for serving)

Assembling the ramen:

Boil noodles according to package directions and add to the Ramen bowls.

Cover noodles with the hot Shio Ramen Soup. Make sure the soup comes right above the noodles.

Top each bowl with 2 quarters of the toasted Nori, half an egg and the marinated scallions. Serve immediately while soup is hot. Drizzle with chili oil if you’d like.

5.0 from 2 reviews
Shio (Salt) Ramen 塩ラーメン
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • My Chicken Stock for Shio Ramen Ingredients:
  • 4 pound whole chicken or cut up pieces
  • Coarse Sea Salt (I prefer Maldon)
  • 1 large onion, peeled & cut in half
  • 1 2-inch piece fresh Ginger peeled
  • 1 head of garlic cut in half lengthwise (no need to peel)
  • Enough cold water to cover the chicken
  • Easy Katsuo Kombu Dashi Ingredients:
  • 4 cups Water
  • 1 4 x 4 inch piece of Kombu (Kelp)
  • 1½ cups, or one big handful, of lightly packed dried Katsuobushi (Bonito flakes)
  • Tare for Shio Ramen (the flavor base for the Ramen) Ingredients:
  • 2 Tablespoons Maldon Sea Salt (or your favorite sea salt)
  • 2 Tablespoons Sake
  • 1 Tablespoon Mirin
  • ½ teaspoon Sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Sesame Oil
  • ¼ teaspoon Soy Sauce
  • Soft Boiled Eggs
  • 2 Large Eggs
  • Marinated Scallions Ingredients:
  • 3 bunches of Scallions (white parts and light green parts), finely chopped diagonally, rinsed thoroughly in cold water and dried
  • 2 Tablespoons Sesame Oil
  • 1 teaspoon Sea Salt
  • ½ teaspoon Soy Sauce
  • ½ teaspoon Sugar
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground Black Pepper
  • For the Shio Ramen Soup Ingredients:
  • 5 cups of Chicken Stock
  • 3 Cups of Katsuo Kombu Dashi
  • Shio Tare
Instructions
  1. My Chicken Stock for Shio Ramen Directions:
  2. You can make the Stock, Dashi & Tare 1-2 days ahead
  3. Salt the chicken all over, inside and out, with coarse sea salt. Place chicken uncovered in the refrigerator at least 12 hours or overnight. The next day place Chicken and vegetables in a large stock pot with enough cold water to cover the chicken. Cook on high heat until you begin to see bubbles on the surface of the liquid. Turn heat down to low so that stock maintains a low, gentle simmer. Skim the scum from the stock with a spoon or fine mesh strainer every 10 to 15 minutes for the first hour of cooking. Simmer for approximately 2 hours.
  4. Strain stock through a fine mesh strainer into a large container. You can store in container with lid in refrigerator for 2 to 3 days or in freezer for up to 3 months.
  5. Easy Katsuo Kombu Dashi Directions:
  6. Combine the Kombu and water in a pot over medium-low heat. The water should be approaching a boil after about 20 minutes (adjust the heat if the water looks like it’s coming to a boil too soon or too slowly). Once the water comes to a boil, immediately turn off heat and remove the Kombu.
  7. Add the dried bonito flakes all at once. Wait until they absorb the water and sink to the bottom of the pot, about 20-30 minutes.
  8. Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve (You can also line a regular strainer with two layers of cheesecloth or paper towels). Do not squeeze the excess liquid from the bonito flakes, this will make the Dashi cloudy and bitter.
  9. Note: Dashi is best used the same day but it may be kept in the refrigerator for up to three days and can be frozen for up to two months. I like to freeze leftover Dashi in ice cube trays.Tare for Shio Ramen (the flavor base for the Ramen) Directions:
  10. Combine all of the ingredients in a small bowl and mix thoroughly. Set aside.
  11. Soft Boiled Eggs
  12. Large Eggs
  13. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil. Carefully add eggs one at a time and gently boil for 7 minutes. Drain eggs and transfer to a bowl of ice water to stop cooking. Let cool. Peel and set aside.
  14. Marinated Scallions Directions:
  15. Thoroughly mix all of the ingredients above in a bowl. Set aside.
  16. For the Shio Ramen Soup Directions:
  17. Combine all ingredients in a large pot making sure all of the Tare ingredients dissolve in the soup.
  18. Keep warm on the stove until noodles are boiled and ready to serve.

 

Comments

  1. amount of tare per serving??? Also, the sea salt will not dissolve into this tare if not heated. is the broth/stock meant to dissolve it?

    • If you notice in the recipe this Tare is mixed into the warm soups. First you mix the two soups together then add in the tare. Both soups are warm so the Tare will dissolve quickly with no problem. I’ve made it many many times and have had no problem. You just stir a few times until the salt is completely dissolved. Once you mix everything together then you serve into individual bowls. I did the recipe this way because I think it’s easier for the home cook instead of measuring the Tare into each bowl. Hope you enjoy it! The soup comes out very good

    • The tare will dissolve in the hot broth when combined. Best to put the tare in the bottom of the bowl and pour the broth over, whisking to combine.

      • Yes it will but the way I wrote this recipe is to combine the tare with the soup before putting everything into the four serving bowls. I thought that would be easier for the home cook. You can do it one bowl at a time if you prefer too. Thank you!

  2. Tsering says:

    Hello thanx if for the recipe do you know how to make soy sau tare and miso tare as well?

  3. Made this the other night.
    WHOA. This was straight up amazing. Delicate with a very layered flavor.
    My only tweak of the recipe was making the broth to dashi ratio 2:1 instead of 5:3, which I felt made the soup a little too dashi forward and made you lose the delicious chicken-y flavor.

    • Thank you for your comments. I like the taste of the dashi combined with the chicken stock and this is a popular combination in Japan now too. You can also try just Kombu dashi and not Katsuo Kombu for a more subtle flavor. It’s fun experimenting with different ratios and get it to your liking. I’m glad you enjoyed the recipe😊

  4. Hey Shirley, nice recipe. I’ll be attempting it this weekend 😀

    I’m a novice cook and was wondering what does the salt do when you rub it on the chicken the night before? Wouldn’t dry brine retain more of the moisture inside the chicken instead of dispersing into the stock?

    Also what brand of soy sauce do you use?

    • Thank you for your comment! The salt actually brings out the flavor in the chicken. I was inspired after tasting my best friends’ Moms’ (the best Vietnamese cook ever) chicken soup for her chicken Pho. This is the way she makes her chicken soup and I just loved the clean flavor so I tried it myself. It was such a rich tasting chicken soup I was hooked! After combining it with my dashi I knew this was a perfect combination. I use Kishibori Shoyu an artisan soy sauce (available at chefshop.com) or Kikkoman organic soy sauce. Good luck with the recipe. I think you’ll love the taste of the chicken stock😊

  5. Shirley,

    I stole your shio tare (very difficult to find tare recipes online) for my duck ramen. Instead of a chicken broth I made a straight duck broth with a leftover duck carcass after making roast duck. I used ginger, scallion and garlic for aromatics in the broth and slowly simmered over night. I used straight kombu dashi instead of using katsuobushi because I simply didn’t have any but for some reason had kombu!

    Anyways, long story short, the shio tare was perfect for the duck ramen since the duck flavor was so strong. The light seasoning of the shio tare really made the duck broth stand out. If I had done a soy or miso tare I think I really would’ve messed up the flavor. Thanks for a great recipe! I learned a lot reading this post.

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