Bukkake Udon ぶっかけうどん Japanese Cold Udon Noodles with Various Toppings

Bukkake Udon ぶっかけうどん Japanese Cold Udon Noodles with Various Toppings

We are in the middle of the nicest Summer in Seattle in over fifty years.  Summer is always very beautiful in Seattle but this year we are having the best Summer I’ve ever experienced. There is an abundance of sunshine (over two months straight) the temperatures are warm but not too hot and the best thing is we don’t get the humidity like most places.  The humidity part is why I spend the Summer at our Seattle home.  After growing up in Tokyo and still living there part of the year I stay away from the heat and humidity they get during Summer.  Living in Seattle has turned me into a heat wimp and I’m not ashamed to say it.

All of this Seattle sun has given me a chance to make (and eat) more cold noodle dishes this Summer.  We practically lived on cold noodles when I was growing up in Japan.  That is really the only thing you feel like eating when the temperatures are in the nineties and the humidity is very high. The last thing you want to eat in steamy weather is something hot so a cold bowl of noodles is just the answer.

One cold noodle dish I have been preparing rather frequently lately is Bukkake Udon.  Bukkake comes from the word Bukkakeru or to pour on or to throw on.  The sauce, or Mentsuyu, is poured over the noodles and then you add, or throw on, a variety of toppings.  You can buy prepared bottled Mentsuyu but I really recommend making your own.  Once you try homemade Mentsuyu you will never go back to the bottle.  You can really taste the difference.  My favorite toppings for Bukkake Udon are grated Daikon and fresh Ginger, Scallions, Katsuobushi (dried, shaved Bonito Flakes), Onsen Tamago (a slow cooked egg), Wasabi and toasted Sesame Seeds.  You can really add anything you like on top of the noodles which makes it a fun dish to make with the kids and get creative.  I hope you are all having a beautiful Summer and hope you enjoy making this dish as much as I do.

Ingredients:  for 4 Servings

4 portions of Udon Noodles of your choice (I like Sanuki Udon)

Mentsuyu (Noodle Dipping Sauce) Recipe Below

Topping Ideas for your Bukkake Udon: (for four servings) 

4 Onsen Tamago (I like this method here)

1/4 – 1/2 cup Katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes)

1 bunch of Scallions (5-6) chopped

4 Tablespoons Grated Ginger

1 cup Grated Daikon (Japanese white radish)

4 teaspoons Toasted Sesame Seeds

Wasabi to taste

Preparation:

Prepare Mentsuyu, Noodle Dipping Sauce (recipe below) and cool the sauce.  I like mine room temperature.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.  Cook Udon Noodles according to package instructions.  Drain noodles in a colander and rinse thoroughly  with cold water to quickly cool down the noodles.  Drain well and divide noodles into four bowls.

Divide the toppings on top of the Udon in the bowls.  Pour the Mentsuyu, Noodle Dipping Sauce, over the noodles right before eating (about 1-1 1/2 cups per serving).  Mix up the toppings with the noodles and dipping sauce as you eat.

Katsuo Kombu Dashi for Mentsuyu:

6 1/4 Cups Water

1 5-6 inch piece of Kombu (dried kelp)

1 large handful (about 2 cups) Katsuobushi (Dried Shaved Bonito Flakes)

Combine the Kombu and water in a pot over medium-low heat.  The water should be approaching a boil after about 20 minutes (adjust the heat if the water looks like it’s coming to a boil too soon or too slowly).  Once the water comes to a boil, immediately turn off heat and remove the Kombu.

Add the dried bonito flakes all at once.  Wait until they absorb the water and sink to the bottom of the pot, about 20-30 minutes.

Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve (You can also line a regular strainer with two layers of cheesecloth or paper towels).  Let strain for a couple of minutes, do not squeeze the excess liquid from the bonito flakes, this will make the Dashi cloudy and bitter.

Note:  Dashi is best used the same day but it may be kept in the refrigerator for up to three days and can be frozen for up to two months.

Mentsuyu (Noodle Sauce):

Ingredients:

6 cups Dashi

1/2 cup Soy Sauce

1/2 cup Mirin

Preparation:

Put Mirin in a medium sauce pan and bring to a boil.  Add soy sauce and Dashi stock and bring to a boil.  Remove from heat and set aside to let cool to room temperature or put in the refrigerator to chill.

Bukkake Udon ぶっかけうどん Japanese Cold Udon Noodles with Various Toppings
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 4 portions of Udon Noodles of your choice
  • Mentsuyu (Noodle Dipping Sauce)
  • ----------------------
  • Topping Ideas for your Bukkake Udon
  • 4 Onsen Tamago (I like this method here)
  • ¼ - ½ cup Katsuobushi (dried bonito flakes)
  • 1 bunch of Scallions (5-6) chopped
  • 4 Tablespoons Grated Ginger
  • 1 cup Grated Daikon (Japanese white radish)
  • 4 teaspoons Toasted Sesame Seeds
  • Wasabi to taste
  • ----------------------
  • Katsuo Kombu Dashi for Mentsuyu
  • 6¼ Cups Water
  • 1 5-6 inch piece of Kombu (dried kelp)
  • 1 large handful (about 2 cups) Katsuobushi (Dried Shaved Bonito Flakes)
  • ----------------------
  • Mentsuyu (Noodle Sauce)
  • 6 cups Dashi
  • ½ cup Soy Sauce
  • ½ cup Mirin
Instructions
  1. Prepare Mentsuyu, Noodle Dipping Sauce (recipe below) and cool the sauce. I like mine room temperature.
  2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Cook Udon Noodles according to package instructions. Drain noodles in a colander and rinse thoroughly with cold water to quickly cool down the noodles. Drain well and divide noodles into four bowls.
  3. Divide the toppings on top of the Udon in the bowls. Pour the Mentsuyu, Noodle Dipping Sauce, over the noodles right before eating (about 1-1½ cups per serving). Mix up the toppings with the noodles and dipping sauce as you eat.
  4. ------------------------
  5. Katsuo Kombu Dashi for Mentsuyu
  6. Combine the Kombu and water in a pot over medium-low heat. The water should be approaching a boil after about 20 minutes (adjust the heat if the water looks like it’s coming to a boil too soon or too slowly). Once the water comes to a boil, immediately turn off heat and remove the Kombu.
  7. Add the dried bonito flakes all at once. Wait until they absorb the water and sink to the bottom of the pot, about 20-30 minutes.
  8. Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve (You can also line a regular strainer with two layers of cheesecloth or paper towels). Let strain for a couple of minutes, do not squeeze the excess liquid from the bonito flakes, this will make the Dashi cloudy and bitter.
  9. Note: Dashi is best used the same day but it may be kept in the refrigerator for up to three days and can be frozen for up to two months.
  10. ------------------
  11. Mentsuyu (Noodle Sauce)
  12. Put Mirin in a medium sauce pan and bring to a boil. Add soy sauce and Dashi stock and bring to a boil. Remove from heat and set aside to let cool to room temperature or put in the refrigerator to chill.

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