Japanese Potato Salad ポテトサラダ

Japanese Potato Salad

I’m back in Seattle!  Yes I just returned from another trip back to our other home in Tokyo and it was filled with pretty pink cherry blossoms and of course, the best food ever.  I tweeted and instagramed every tiny morsel of food that I put in my mouth.  I always do this when I’m in Tokyo.  I guess I do the same thing when I’m in Seattle too.  Oh well what can I say?  I want everyone to enjoy the experience right along with me.  I think food tastes better when shared with friends don’t you?

When we are in Tokyo, and eating at one of our favorite neighborhood restaurants, I always have put the hashtag Azabujuban on every photo I tweet or Instagram.  Azabujuban is our adorable Tokyo neighborhood and one of the best places to live in my opinion.  I don’t think we could’ve picked a better place to set up our second home.  Many of Tokyo’s top restaurants and trendy shops are within walking distance so it’s the perfect place for me that’s for sure.

One of our favorite neighborhood restaurants, and a place you hear me talk about over and over again, is Edoya.  Edoya is a famous Yoshoku-ya, or a restaurant specializing in Western food served Japanese style.  They also have the best Japanese potato salad I ever tasted.  I really wanted to try and make this potato salad at home in Seattle as soon as I returned so I spent this past weekend making potato salad.  Hubby sure didn’t mind he was my taste tester.  I am so happy to report I think I got it pretty close.  The ingredient that made a big difference was Karashi, or Japanese spicy mustard.  It added that kick that I was looking for.  Also please try and use Japanese Kewpie mayonnaise when making this recipe.  It is a must for Japanese Potato Salad.  The Karashi spicy mustard and Kewpie Mayonnaise are both available in the Asian food aisle of most grocery stores and on amazon.com.

Japanese Potato Salad

Ingredients:  Serves 4

4 medium Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and quartered
1/3 cup Kewpie (Japanese) mayonnaise
1/2 cucumber (preferably Japanese or English) thinly sliced
1/4 yellow onion, thinly sliced
1/2 carrot, peeled and thinly sliced
extra sea salt for salting & blanching vegetables

Group A ingredients:

1/3 teaspoon freshly ground Black Pepper
1 teaspoon Sea Salt
1 Tablespoon Rice Vinegar
1 Tablespoon Sugar (I use Japanese superfine Sugar but regular sugar is fine)
1/3 teaspoon Karashi, Japanese spicy mustard

Preparation:

Put the potatoes in a saucepan of cold, salted water so the water is just covering the top of the potatoes.  Bring to a simmer.  Cook the potatoes until a paring knife or wooden skewer poked into them goes in without resistance, about 15 minutes.  Drain the potatoes in a colander.

While Potatoes are cooking prepare the other vegetables:

Sprinkle both onion slices and cucumber slices lightly with sea salt, mix with your hands making sure the salt coats them evenly.  Set aside for 10 minutes.  After 10 minutes rinse off vegetables in a colander and wrap and gently squeeze vegetables in a clean dish cloth or a few paper towels to get all of the moisture out.  This is a very important step and will prevent soggy potato salad.

Add carrot slices to a small saucepan of salted water, bring to a boil and blanch for two minutes.  They should still have a slight crunch, do not overcook.  Drain and set aside.

Place the cooked potatoes into a medium sized bowl and gently smash with a fork making sure you leave some small chunks.  In a small bowl mix together the Group A ingredients and pour over the smashed potatoes, gently tossing to evenly coat the potatoes.  Add the onions, cucumber, carrots and Kewpie Mayonnaise and gently combine with the potato mixture until all of the ingredients are combined.  Serve at room temperature or chilled in the refrigerator.

4.9 from 12 reviews
Japanese Potato Salad ポテトサラダ
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 4 medium Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and quartered
  • ⅓ cup Kewpie (Japanese) mayonnaise
  • ½ cucumber (preferably Japanese or English) thinly sliced
  • ¼ yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • ½ carrot, peeled and thinly sliced
  • extra sea salt for salting & blanching vegetables
  • Group A ingredients:
  • ⅓ teaspoon freshly ground Black Pepper
  • 1 teaspoon Sea Salt
  • 1 Tablespoon Rice Vinegar
  • 1 Tablespoon Sugar (I use Japanese superfine Sugar but regular sugar is fine)
  • ⅓ teaspoon Karashi, Japanese spicy mustard
Instructions
  1. Put the potatoes in a saucepan of cold, salted water so the water is just covering the top of the potatoes. Bring to a simmer.
  2. Cook the potatoes until a paring knife or wooden skewer poked into them goes in without resistance, about 15 minutes. Drain the potatoes in a colander.
  3. While Potatoes are cooking prepare the other vegetables:
  4. Sprinkle both onion slices and cucumber slices lightly with sea salt, mix with your hands making sure the salt coats them evenly. Set aside for 10 minutes.
  5. After 10 minutes rinse off vegetables in a colander and wrap and gently squeeze vegetables in a clean dish cloth or a few paper towels to get all of the moisture out. This is a very important step and will prevent soggy potato salad.
  6. Add carrot slices to a small saucepan of salted water, bring to a boil and blanch for two minutes. They should still have a slight crunch, do not overcook. Drain and set aside.
  7. Place the cooked potatoes into a medium sized bowl and gently smash with a fork making sure you leave some small chunks. In a small bowl mix together the Group A ingredients and pour over the smashed potatoes, gently tossing to evenly coat the potatoes. Add the onions, cucumber, carrots and Kewpie Mayonnaise and gently combine with the potato mixture until all of the ingredients are combined.
  8. Serve at room temperature or chilled in the refrigerator.

 

Comments

  1. What is the difference of the Japanese mayo? Can we use a home-made one?
    Thank you for sharing!

    • Shirley says:

      Yes of course you can make your own that would be best! Kewpie mayo is closer to homemade than American mayo in my opinion that’s why I recommend it. Thank you for your comment and question 🙂

  2. Thanks for the recipe! We loved it (even my Japanese husband said it was one of the best he has had. I didn’t have any karashi, so left it out, but I suppose I could have used dried mustard?! It was great even without it. I added corn to the recipe as well.

    • Shirley says:

      You’re very welcome Maya! I’m so happy you both enjoyed it. My Japanese husband loves it too :). I highly recommend adding the Karashi next time, it gives the potato salad such great flavor! I’ve never used dry mustard before in potato salad so not sure how that would taste but please try to add the Karashi next time. You will see what a difference it makes. Thank you so much for the nice comment.

  3. I tried this recipe and my Japanese husband was very happy ! It was perfect . Thanks so much ! I was longing for this recipe when we had some in a restaurant a few weeks ago ..

    • Thank you Donna I’m so happy to hear that! I just made it again on Friday since my hubby just returned from Tokyo the previous day. It is our favorite potato salad that’s for sure 🙂

  4. This potato salad is amazing! I haven’t had a chance to post it on my website yet, but when I tried your recipe I couldn’t stop myself from making more!

  5. Thanks for sharing! The recipe is very detail thus especially helpful for people like me who does not cook very often. ^^

    • You’re welcome Carrie! I’m so happy you enjoyed the recipe. I try to make it simple so everyone can make my dishes. I really appreciate your comment.

  6. Celeste says:

    Hi, I’m just wondering if I can replace karashi with American mild mustard?
    I left it out and the salad still very very good! It’s as good as the one we had in Tokyo.
    Thanks for sharing!

    • Shirley says:

      Thank you Celeste! You could substitute with American mild mustard but it will change the taste a little. The Karashi adds just a little kick and gives the potato salad great flavor. I’m glad you enjoyed it even without the mustard.

  7. Mabel Chew says:

    Hi, I have just tried the receipt posted by you. The salad turns out to be fantastic. My family love it. Thank you for sharing!! ^__^

    • Shirley says:

      Thank you Mabel! I’m happy to hear your family enjoyed it. We all love this potato salad recipe as well and can’t get enough of it 🙂

  8. Made this and it was sooo good. Thanks for the tasty recipe!

    • Shirley says:

      Thank you Kathy! I’m glad to hear you liked the recipe. It’s a favorite of ours as well. I just made this two days ago and am craving it again 🙂

  9. Adiporn says:

    could I cook Potato with Microwave ?

  10. I hvent made your recipe yet. If I cant find karachi mustard what can I substitue it with? Thank you! Looking forward to making this recipe!

    • You could just leave it out or use another mustard. If possible I’d recommend trying to get the Karashi if you can. It really makes the potato salad flavor stand out😊

  11. I used regular American mayo (best foods) , russet potatoes, n regular cucumbers because that’s what I had on hand n it’s ok. Might have to adjust salt, sugar according to taste..mine was a little bland and onion-y. Probably tastes amazing with all the authentic ingredients called for in the recipe. I’ll pick up kewpie mayo next time at the Asian market n try again.

  12. I am looking forward to making this to serve with my new favorite Kalbi marinade you have created. Can’t wait to try the Japenese mustard….. THANK YOU SO MUCH.

  13. While stationed in Sasebo we would often head to Manako’s to have a meal of fried chicken and Japanese potato salad. I tried and tried to make the potato salad without success. Until today. Oh my! Yum!!! Thank you for bringing back the awesome memories!

  14. Kathy Jennings says:

    This is a wonderful recipe that sends my whole family into orbit–we lived in Japan for over 10 years and our kids grew up there. My suggestion for those who can’t find karashi is to use Colman’s English mustard. DO NOT use American yellow mustard. Mustard powder dissolved with a little water (or just straight) would be better.

    Thanks so much for the recipe.

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