Katsudon (Japanese Pork Cutlet over Rice)

Katsudon Japanese Pork Cutlet over Rice

Let me tell you how much I love Katsudon.  I really really love it.  I love it so much that it’s always one of the first things I eat as soon as I land in Tokyo.  Katsu is short for Tonkatsu, or deep fried pork cutlet and Don is short for Donburi, or bowl.  I rarely make Katsudon at home.  Growing up in Japan I had the best Katsudon all around me and I could eat it whenever I wanted.  It was always something we went out to eat when I was a child.  Mom never made it at home because it was so much easier to go out and eat it at the local Katsu restaurant around the corner or call and have it delivered.  It is a little time consuming to make at home but it is so worth it.

I decided I needed to make Katsudon a few days ago because I had a serious craving.  I won’t be back in Tokyo until the end of September and I just couldn’t wait that long.  That bowl of  fluffy rice topped with juicy pork cutlet smothered in onions and egg is something I dream about.  When I get a craving for something I must have it immediately that’s just me.  Just writing about it now is making my mouth water.

We have a couple of places here in Seattle that have Katsudon on the menu but I hate to say they’re not worth going to.  Seattle has some of the best restaurants in the country but they are seriously lacking in good Japanese food.  Hopefully that will change someday.  Until then I’ll just have to make it myself and I hope you do too!  Once you taste the way Katsudon is supposed to taste you won’t settle for a mediocre bowl again.

The ingredients below are for two Katsudon but I like to prepare them one at a time so the preparation below is for one Katsudon.  You can do both at one time in one large skillet if you’d like.

Ingredients:  for 2 Katsudon 

2/3 cup dashi stock
2 tablespoon superfine or Japanese sugar
2 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
3 teaspoons mirin
2 extra large eggs (beat one for each Katsudon)
1/2 yellow onion sliced thin
2 Tonkatsu, sliced
Enough cooked Japanese white rice for two large bowls
Optional:  Garnish with Chopped Mitsuba (Japanese Wild Parsley) or Kizami Nori (Seaweed Flakes)

Preparation for one Katsudon: 

1.  In a small bowl, combine the Dashi, sugar, soy sauce and mirin making sure the sugar is completely dissolved.

2.  Add half of the Dashi mixture to a small frying pan over medium heat and bring to a simmer.  Add half of the sliced onions to the dashi mixture and cook until onions are fragrant and start to turn translucent, about one or two minutes.

3.  Nestle one Tonkatsu on top of the onions.  Drizzle one slightly beaten egg over the Tonkatsu.  Cover with a lid and cook until the egg is set (about 1 minute or a little longer if you like yours well done).

4.  Divide the rice between two large bowls.  Slide the Tonkatsu and egg carefully from the pan over the rice.  Top with chopped Mitsuba.  Serve the Katsudon immediately.

4.8 from 10 reviews
Katsudon (Japanese Pork Cutlet over Rice)
Serves: 2
 
Ingredients
  • ⅔ cup dashi stock
  • 2 tablespoon superfine or Japanese sugar
  • 2½ tablespoons soy sauce
  • 3 teaspoons mirin
  • 2 extra large eggs (beat one for each Katsudon)
  • ½ yellow onion sliced thin
  • 2 Tonkatsu, sliced
  • Enough cooked Japanese white rice for two large bowls
  • Optional: Garnish with Chopped Mitsuba (Japanese Wild Parsley) or Kizami Nori (Seaweed Flakes)
Instructions
  1. In a small bowl, combine the Dashi, sugar, soy sauce and mirin making sure the sugar is completely dissolved.
  2. Add half of the Dashi mixture to a small frying pan over medium heat and bring to a simmer. Add half of the sliced onions to the dashi mixture and cook until onions are fragrant and start to turn translucent, about one or two minutes.
  3. Nestle one Tonkatsu on top of the onions. Drizzle one slightly beaten egg over the Tonkatsu. Cover with a lid and cook until the egg is set (about 1 minute or a little longer if you like yours well done).
  4. Divide the rice between two large bowls. Slide the Tonkatsu and egg carefully from the pan over the rice. Top with chopped Mitsuba. Serve the Katsudon immediately.

Comments

  1. I am going to cook this tomorrow – how are you Shirley? Its so funny to see a picture of 1/8th of you…hope to meet the other 7/8 of you in Tokyo later this year LOL

  2. Thank you Dean! I hope you enjoy the recipe. I’m going to have a regular photo on my blog soon 🙂

  3. I was stationed on board 2 us navy ships homeported in yokosuka japan – I used to order this dish at the enlisted club @ us navy base, I also went out in town to eat – I’m here to tell you that is a 5 star dish (5 out of 5).

    • Thank you so much for your comment! Sorry for the late reply. I wasn’t getting the comments in my email 🙁 I was a military brat and that’s why I went to Japan when I was 5 years old! I’ve been to Yokosuka many times

  4. Meggy Shareef says:

    Suuuuper good! I’m so glad I came across this recipe. I don’t need to spend so much in Japanese restaurants for something I can make so easily. Personally I added some shitake mushroom and leeks to the dish and it was the bomb! Thank you so much for this!

    • That sounds delicious! Sorry for the late reply I wasn’t getting my blog comments in my email 🙁 hopefully it’s fixed now. I love Shiitake mushrooms what a great addition.

  5. this is awesome! Love your katsudon recipe!

  6. As a kid, I spent a couple years living near Fussa. Katsudon was my family’s favorite meal to get when eating out. Unfortunately, finding a restaurant in the states that serves it can be difficult. My mom has been fixing her own version for the last 20 years, but it wasn’t quite right (sorry, mom!). I just prepared this recipe for my parents for the first time last night and WOW! We were amazed! I am in katsudon heaven! This recipe is the real deal. Thank you!!

    • Thank you so much! So sorry for the late response but the comments haven’t been getting emailed to me 🙁 so I just noticed a few comments I didn’t know about. I’m so happy you enjoyed the recipe.

  7. This recipe was truly fantastic. I admit that I cheesed out and used chicken broth instead of dashi, but the result was great. Thank you!

    • Thank you! Yes you can use chicken stock in pretty much everything that requires dashi but please try and make & use dashi next time (not the instant powder there is a night & day different) I think you’ll be surprised how much flavor & umami it adds to the dish. Dashi isn’t fishy I know many people are afraid of that. Try it next time! 🙂

  8. This recipe is good! I used Ajinomoto Hondashi instead of dashi. I cooked this with the kids and loved it! Thanks for sharing this!

  9. 5 stars for this great recipe!

  10. Charlynn lim says:

    Hi. May i know what kind of mirin should be used for d sauce ? Thank you.

    • You can use any mirin. Kikkoman makes a great one. Just make sure it’s regular mirin and not Aji Mirin which tastes a little different. Thank you for the question and I hope you enjoy the recipe 🙂

  11. Wanted to say that I made this yesterday and it ROCKED! Thank you very much for the recipe! First time making dashi and I couldn’t believe the delicious smells that came from the broth. Thanks again!

    • Thank you so much! I’m so glad you enjoyed it. Dashi makes all the difference I always tell people😊❤ sorry for the late reply I wasn’t getting my comments by email.

  12. Watching all this yuri on ice has made me hungry. Can’t wait to try this recipe!

    • Ariarimatcha says:

      Same here! I’mso sad it ended, though. (There better be a season 2)

    • Thank you so much! Sorry for the late reply I never got your comment emailed to me & just happened to see it. I always tell people you could use chicken or vegetable stock but Dashi makes all the difference 😊❤

  13. Thanks for the recipe. My Mom died a couple years ago and I am really missing her. The taste of this Katsudon really reminded me of her katsudon and took me back to a happier time. Thank you so much. Merry Christmas

    • Thank you for the sweet comment. I’m so happy this recipe brought back good memories about your mother. It’s one of my favorite comfort foods too. 😊❤

  14. Can you also make this without the mirin?

    • Yes you definitely could make it without Mirin but the flavor would definitely be affected. Sake & Mirin are usually used together and are basic ingredients in a lot of Japanese dishes (and are not the same even though a lot of American food sites call it a sweet Sake which is not true). A little more sugar could be substituted to add a little more sweetness which is what Mirin adds. If you can find Mirin I would recommend following the recipe. 😊❤

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