Pork Sauté, A Japanese Yoshoku Pork Chop

Pork Saute A Japanese Yoshoku Pork ChopHere is another example of the Japanese taking a simple dish like a pork chop and turning it into something special.  I’ve written about many other Yoshoku dishes on my blog and Pork Sauté is another favorite of mine.  Pork Sauté is pan-seared pork chop smothered in a fabulous red wine sauce.  How could I not love that?  This is a dish that comes together in no time and is perfect for a busy weeknight dinner and fancy enough for an elegant dinner party at home.

I first tasted this dish at a favorite Yoshoku-ya in Yokohama, a little hole-in-the-wall place with three tables and a counter.  This description fits many of the restaurants hubby and I frequented in college, when we first started dating, and most of the Mom and Pop restaurants scattered across Japan.  These type of restaurants are usually where you will find the best food in my opinion.  The Master, or owner, of the restaurant always looked like he just got out of bed.  His hair was always a mess and his kitchen didn’t seem that clean to me.  He always wore a stained, white Chef’s coat which was kind of funny because he really didn’t look like a Chef to me.  The first time I stepped into his tiny place I have to be honest I was a little disgusted, and very surprised, that my friends spoke so highly about this man and his food.  I almost walked out without ordering that first time.  That would have been a big mistake.

One of the most popular dishes at this restaurant was the Pork Sauté.  Everyone raved about it, especially the sauce.  The Master would cut the pork chop to order from a huge slab right in front of you.  He would always cut it nice and thick.  His portions were considered generous compared to most Japanese restaurants so all of my fellow Americans loved to eat there.  After trying his Pork Sauté I realized why everyone adored it.  He seared the meat perfectly and the sauce was sublime.  I did not leave one drop of that sauce, soaking it up with the Japanese rice he served on the side.  We became regulars after that first meal and Master became a very close friend of ours.  He even made me chicken soup and brought it over when I was sick and couldn’t leave my apartment.  I guess you really can’t judge a book by it’s cover.  He did learn to clean up a little better though.

For this recipe I use beautiful Carlton Farms pork chops from my favorite Butcher, Rainshadow Meats in Seattle.  I used a one-inch thick pork chop with the bone-in but if you prefer, and if you’re short on time, you can use a thinner cut pork chop or even a chicken breast.  This sauce goes great with both.

Recipe:  Serves 2 large portions or 4 smaller ones

Pork ChopsIngredients:

4 large Pork Chops
Sea Salt
Freshly Ground Black Pepper
2 teaspoons Canola or Vegetable Oil

Sauce Ingredients:

2 Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce
3 Tablespoons Ketchup
2 teaspoons Dijon Mustard
1 cup of good quality Red Wine

Liberally season both sides of each pork chop with salt and pepper.  Mix all of the sauce ingredients well in a small bowl and set aside.

Pork Chops cooking

Add the oil to a large skillet or fry pan and place over medium high high heat.  When the pan is hot add the pork chops, they should sizzle when placed in the pan.  Fry the first side for about 3-4 minutes depending on the thickness of your pork chops, you want a nice deep brown crust on the chops.  Flip over to the other side and continue to cook the chops for another 1-2 minutes.

Remove excess fat from pork chops

If there is any excess fat from the pork chops you can blot the pan with a rolled up paper towel using tongs.

Japanese Yoshoku Pork Chops cooking

Lower the heat to medium and slowly add the sauce ingredients to the pork chops in the pan and continue to cook until reduced and thickened while turning the chops a few times so they’re well coated with the sauce.  Plate the chops with a little sauce poured over each one.  I love serving this with a nice vegetable and Japanese rice on the side.

Pork Sauté, A Japanese Yoshoku Pork Chop
 
Ingredients
  • 4 large Pork Chops
  • Sea Salt
  • Freshly Ground Black Pepper
  • 2 teaspoons Canola or Vegetable Oil
  • Sauce Ingredients:
  • 2 Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce
  • 3 Tablespoons Ketchup
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon Mustard
  • 1 cup of good quality Red Wine
Instructions
  1. Liberally season both sides of each pork chop with salt and pepper. Mix all of the sauce ingredients well in a small bowl and set aside.
  2. Add the oil to a large skillet or fry pan and place over medium high high heat. When the pan is hot add the pork chops, they should sizzle when placed in the pan. Fry the first side for about 3-4 minutes depending on the thickness of your pork chops, you want a nice deep brown crust on the chops. Flip over to the other side and continue to cook the chops for another 1-2 minutes.
  3. If there is any excess fat from the pork chops you can blot the pan with a rolled up paper towel using tongs.
  4. Lower the heat to medium and slowly add the sauce ingredients to the pork chops in the pan and continue to cook until reduced and thickened while turning the chops a few times so they're well coated with the sauce. Plate the chops with a little sauce poured over each one. I love serving this with a nice vegetable and Japanese rice on the side.

 

Comments

  1. I made this tonight and it was absolutely delicious and so easy. It is a black Alaia flat – so simple yet such a necessary basic. Plese post more of these super easy and super delicious recipes.

    • Thank you for the very nice comment! As a huge Alaia fan I have to say your comment made my day 🙂 I try to keep my recipes pretty simple and plan to have more quick dishes in the future, so glad you enjoyed it.

  2. Hi Shirley,

    I just discovered your blog a few week’s ago when I was looking for a pork belly recipe. I’m hoping to try that out this upcoming weekend. I just noticed this post for the Pork Saute and it looks so easy and amazing too! Keep up the great work!

    From your neighbour in Vancouver, BC!

    • Thank you for the comment and I’m so happy you found me! I love sharing my everyday Japanese recipes and hope you enjoy them.

  3. Hi Shirley, Can pork be substituted for beef in this dish? Please advise. Thanks!

    • Yes Shamila, beef or chicken can be substituted in this recipe. This sauce really tastes great on anything. Hope you enjoy it.

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