Kimchi, Mushroom and Tofu Hot Pot

Kimchi, Mushroom and Tofu Hot PotI recently had the most amazing experience.  I was lucky enough to be asked to do a Hot Pot (or Nabe in Japanese) cooking class at Tom Douglas Restaurants’ Dahlia Workshop.  This was a really big deal for me and truly a dream come true.  I’m a home cook who started posting photos of my cooking on Twitter and have only been blogging for a little over a year.  I’m not a big time chef or famous Blogger so I was very honored to be asked to teach a class with Tom Douglas.  I’ve always admired Tom Douglas and the people who work for him.  They are the most professional and nicest people you’ll ever meet.  If you go into any of his restaurants you can see why he’s so successful.  They make everyone feel so welcome and really seem to enjoy what they do.

The Workshop usually only offers classes with their own Tom Douglas restaurant chefs and not many outsiders get the opportunity to teach there.  Was I nervous?  Of course I was but I did have the opportunity to do a bento demo at their famous Summer Culinary Camp in July (another great honor) and that was the real test for me.  I figured if I enjoyed it, didn’t pass out or make a fool of myself then I can teach anywhere.  I know that sounds pretty dumb but to me it was a moment to really challenge myself and not be afraid to stand up in front of a large group of people and cook.

One of the hot pot dishes I prepared for the class was a meatless Kimchi, Mushroom and Tofu hot pot.  I also demonstrated a quick way to make Japanese Dashi stock.  The flavor of the rich Dashi in the dish adds so much flavor it makes you forget that there is no meat.  This dish was a big hit and even the people who thought they didn’t like kimchi or tofu loved it.  What made me the most happy was when a couple of students came up to me at the end of class and said they didn’t realize Japanese cooking was so simple.  I love hearing that.  And to think this all started with that first food tweet in my kitchen.

Kimchi, Mushroom and Tofu Hot Pot

Ingredients:  serves 4

4 cups Dashi (see recipe below)
1 cup Sake
1/2 cup Mirin
1/2 cup soy sauce
2 cups Napa Kimchi
1 package firm tofu, cut into 8 pieces
1/2 pound Shiitake Mushrooms ( about 16) stemmed
1 package enoki mushrooms
1 package Shimeji mushrooms
2 ounces garlic chives (Nira) cut into 2-3-inch pieces
Shichimi Togarashi (Japanese seven spice) for serving

mushrooms
Preparation:  Serves four

Prepare the broth by combining the dashi, sake, mirin and soy sauce in a bowl and set aside.

Add the kimchi and tofu to the hot pot and add the broth.  Cover the pot and bring to a boil over high heat.  Lower heat to medium and simmer for 5 minutes.

Uncover the hot pot and add all of the mushrooms, randomly scattering them on top of the other ingredients.  Cover the pot and simmer for 5 minutes more.  Uncover the pot and add the garlic chives, simmer one minute longer.

Transfer the pot to the table.  Serve the ingredients with the broth adding Shichimi Togarashi (Japanese Seven Spice mix) for an extra kick

Kimchi, Mushroom and Tofu Hot Pot
Easy Dashi Stock

8 cups Water
2 4-inch pieces of Kombu kelp
3 cups lightly packed dried Katsuobushi (Bonito flakes)

1.  Combine the Kombu and water in a pot over medium-low heat.  The water should be approaching a boil after about 20 minutes (adjust the heat if the water looks like it’s coming to a boil too soon or too slowly).  Once the water comes to a boil, immediately turn off heat and remove the Kombu.

2.  Add the dried bonito flakes all at once.  Wait until they absorb the water and sink to the bottom of the pot, about 20-30 minutes.

3. Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve (You can also line a regular strainer with two layers of cheesecloth or paper towels).  Do not squeeze the excess liquid from the bonito flakes, this will make the Dashi cloudy and bitter.

Note:  Dashi is best used the same day but it may be kept in the refrigerator for up to three days and can be frozen for up to two months.

Kimchi, Mushroom and Tofu Hot Pot
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 4 cups Dashi (see recipe below)
  • 1 cup Sake
  • ½ cup Mirin
  • ½ cup soy sauce
  • 2 cups Napa Kimchi
  • 1 package firm tofu, cut into 8 pieces
  • ½ pound Shiitake Mushrooms ( about 16) stemmed
  • 1 package enoki mushrooms
  • 1 package Shimeji mushrooms
  • 2 ounces garlic chives (Nira) cut into 2-3-inch pieces
  • Shichimi Togarashi (Japanese seven spice) for serving
  • ---Easy Dashi Stock ingredients
  • 8 cups Water
  • 2 4-inch pieces of Kombu kelp
  • 3 cups lightly packed dried Katsuobushi (Bonito flakes)
Instructions
  1. Prepare the broth by combining the dashi, sake, mirin and soy sauce in a bowl and set aside.
  2. Add the kimchi and tofu to the hot pot and add the broth. Cover the pot and bring to a boil over high heat. Lower heat to medium and simmer for 5 minutes.
  3. Uncover the hot pot and add all of the mushrooms, randomly scattering them on top of the other ingredients. Cover the pot and simmer for 5 minutes more. Uncover the pot and add the garlic chives, simmer one minute longer.
  4. Transfer the pot to the table. Serve the ingredients with the broth adding Shichimi Togarashi (Japanese Seven Spice mix) for an extra kick
  5. ---Easy Dashi
  6. Combine the Kombu and water in a pot over medium-low heat. The water should be approaching a boil after about 20 minutes (adjust the heat if the water looks like it's coming to a boil too soon or too slowly). Once the water comes to a boil, immediately turn off heat and remove the Kombu.
  7. Add the dried bonito flakes all at once. Wait until they absorb the water and sink to the bottom of the pot, about 20-30 minutes.
  8. Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve (You can also line a regular strainer with two layers of cheesecloth or paper towels). Do not squeeze the excess liquid from the bonito flakes, this will make the Dashi cloudy and bitter.

 

Comments

  1. Oh Shirley, it’s not surprising to me that you are teaching others, including chefs on healthy and asian cuisine. I write asian as it’s not limited to just japanese but korean and other asian cultures as well. I think because you’re infused with north american culture as well, it’s a great mix! You are an incredible teacher and chef yourself.. I also love how you share and spread this passion of yours. I see nothing but success for you. : )
    Plus, this dish is making my mouth water!

    • Thank for your words of encouragement. I am so lucky to have friends like you who inspire me every day. Hope you try this dish with your friends’ kimchi.

  2. Congratulations Shirley! I love the photo of the beautiful mushrooms. Hopefully I can attend the next cooking class in the series.

  3. Mmmm! So yummy and so awesome an opportunity for you to teach!

    • Thank you Silver! I really enjoy teaching people about Japanese food and am very fortunate to be able to do this.

  4. That hot pot is making my mouth water!!
    And I’ve heard so many great things about what an engaging teacher you are that I really must somehow get on your student list one of these days. I know you have a wealth of cooking knowledge to impart to all of us, and I come back here to look at your recipes often!

    • Thank you Sheri for the very sweet comment. I’m still learning every day but it’s fun sharing Japanese cooking with everyone.

  5. That is awesome congrats – i am a huge fan om Kimchi after living in S. Korea for 5 year, but Kimchi is Korean – really Japanese will eat Kimchi 🙂 i was always never due to the love/hate relationship they have 🙂

  6. Thank you for the comment. Yes kimchi is originally from Korea but kimchi is a big part of Japanese cooking now too. I grew up in Tokyo and lived there for 28 years and still live there part time. I see kimchi all around Japan and see how much my Japanese family and friends love it. It’s not just a Korean food anymore.

  7. Shirley, that class was so much fun! I hope you teach another one. The kimchi hot pot was delicious!

  8. Thank you so much Terumi! Hopefully I’ll be doing some new classes in the Spring, very excited!

  9. Hi ShIrley,
    Just discovered your website, looking for something else to prepare with kimchi and tofu. Found your recipe, looks delicious to me and I want to try out. But, living inEurooe, I have no clue how much 1 package of the 2 mushrooms mentioned weights. And I am not (yet?) an experinced cook who can estimate.
    Thx a lot,
    X magda

    • Than you for your comment Magda! I’m sorry about the measurements. It’s a small bunch of about 12 tiny mushrooms. You can use any type of mushroom you’d like just mix it up. Whatever you can find there is great. These are very common Japanese mushrooms that are readily available in the US now but any mushroom would go with this hot pot. 🙂

  10. Hi Shirley,
    I made this dish (with other mushrooms, as you suggested) and it was very tasty, very flavourful. Everybody loved it, got lots of compliments. Definetely wil make this again, and again, and … Thank you very much for sharing your recipe!
    Kind regards, Magda

  11. Christine says:

    Thank you for this fantastic recipe! I made it last night for my meat-loving children and my vegetarian husband and we all loved it. It was absolutely delicious! I served it with a bit of rice on the side but I think that noodles in the broth might be nice. Interestingly, the soup tastes a lot like a typical Portuguese beef and kale soup that my family enjoys, which is quite odd because there are absolutely no ingredients in common. I was so happy to have found your blog. Today I will make your kimchi bacon fried rice. There are so many other recipes that I can’t wait to try.

    • thank you Christine! I’m so happy you enjoyed it. Yes most Japanese add noodles at the end of eating the hot pot with the leftover broth or you can add rice with a beaten egg and let it cook in the broth (My favorite way to end a hot pot dinner). The funny thing is I know that Portuguese soup you speak of. My BIL is Portugese American and my sister makes that soup often 🙂 enjoy the kimchi fried rice!

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