Teriyaki Steak with Wasabi and Lemon Zest

Teriyaki Steak with Wasabi and Lemon ZestI think everyone in America knows Teriyaki.  I’m almost positive everyone in Seattle knows Teriyaki.  I recently read somewhere that Seattle has so many Teriyaki restaurants they were thinking of naming it the official dish of Seattle.  Well, I’m not so sure about all that but I do know Seattle does have many teriyaki restaurants compared to other cities and some of them are pretty good.  Most are not really Teriyaki though, they’re Korean barbecue, but that’s okay lots of people confuse the two.  They’re very different dishes.  I’ll get into that when I do a Korean Bulgogi post.  Making your own Teriyaki sauce is so much easier than you think plus you can control the sweetness and  saltiness of the sauce.  Most restaurant teriyaki sauces are just too salty for me.  I’m sure most of them come from a bottle and are brushed on right before they serve you your meal.  No thanks, I’d rather make it myself and you can too.  Once you taste homemade Teriyaki sauce you’ll never open that bottle again.

Teriyaki is the actual cooking technique which food is broiled or grilled in a sweet, soy based sauce.  The traditional Teriyaki sauce is usually one part sugar, two parts soy sauce and four parts sake.  This mixture is then slowly cooked and reduced to make a thick, perfectly sweet and slightly salty sauce.  The sauce is then brushed on meat, fish, tofu and even tastes great on vegetables.  Most people here think of Teriyaki as a quick, cheap Japanese fast food lunch or dinner but I want to change that way of thinking.  Teriyaki can become a gourmet meal when drizzled over a gorgeous, thick and juicy steak.  Add some kick with wasabi and a little lemon zest and you have an elegant and romantic, special-occasion dinner that can be prepared in a short amount of time.

In this recipe I used Filet Mignon but feel free to use your favorite steak, this sauce will compliment any cut of meat.  I love having my Teriyaki Steak with Japanese rice but it goes well with baked or mashed potatoes, french fries, or on top of a green salad.  Any way you serve it I know this recipe will become a family favorite that you will make again and again.  This recipe is adapted from Japanese Home Cooking with Master Chef Murata by Yoshihiro Murata.

Teriyaki steakIngredients: (Serves 2)

2 Filet Mignons about 1/4 inch thick and 6-8 ounces each
1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
Freshly ground black pepper

Lemon and horseradish for teriyaki steakTeriyaki Sauce (mixed in advance until sugar dissolves)

2 Tablespoons Sugar (I use superfine sugar)
1/4 cup Soy Sauce
1/2 cup Sake

For Serving

2 teaspoons Wasabi Paste
1/2 teaspoon Lemon Zest

Teriyaki steak cookingPreparation:

1.  Pat filet mignons dry with a paper towel and season both sides with black pepper.  Heat a skillet over medium high heat, add the vegetable oil and sear the steaks on both sides until brown.  Lower the heat to medium.  Add the Teriyaki sauce and simmer, shaking the pan and basting the steaks with the sauce until the sauce thickens and glazes the steaks, about 5-7 minutes.

teriyaki steak cooking

2.  Transfer the steaks to a cutting board and cut into 1/2 inch thick slices.

3.  Arrange the slices on two plates and pour the sauce over the steaks.  Sprinkle lemon zest on each steak and serve with small amount of wasabi on the side.

Teriyaki Steak with Wasabi and Lemon Zest
Serves: 2
 
Ingredients
  • 2 Filet Mignons about ¼ inch thick and 6-8 ounces each
  • 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Teriyaki Sauce (mixed in advance until sugar dissolves)
  • 2 Tablespoons Sugar (I use superfine sugar)
  • ¼ cup Soy Sauce
  • ½ cup Sake
  • For serving:
  • 2 teaspoons Wasabi Paste
  • ½ teaspoon Lemon Zest
Instructions
  1. Pat filet mignons dry with a paper towel and season both sides with black pepper. Heat a skillet over medium high heat, add the vegetable oil and sear the steaks on both sides until brown. Lower the heat to medium.
  2. Add the Teriyaki sauce and simmer, shaking the pan and basting the steaks with the sauce until the sauce thickens and glazes the steaks, about 5-7 minutes.
  3. Transfer the steaks to a cutting board and cut into ½ inch thick slices.
  4. Arrange the slices on two plates and pour the sauce over the steaks. Sprinkle lemon zest on each steak and serve with small amount of wasabi on the side.

 

Comments

  1. Would this work just as well if the meat was cooked on a bbq? Then the teriyaki sauce basted? I love sliced beef on top of plain rice or salad and this is perfect!

    • Shirley says:

      Yes Chantale, you can grill the steaks and brush on the sauce right towards the end of the grilling time. Sauce can be reduced in a saucepan separately. Thank you for the comment!

  2. Mmmm I love teriyaki! I agree though, I can’t stand the bottled stuff anymore. These steaks look amazing! We always dry rub and grill ours. I’m definitely going to have to try cooking them like this next time!

    • Shirley says:

      Yes homemade teriyaki sauce tastes much better and it’s so much better for you. Thank you for the comment and I hope you enjoy the recipe!

  3. Thanks for the recipe! I love a good teriyaki recipe!

    PS. That steak looks amazing!

  4. Shirley says:

    It’s a great recipe and you can also just make the sauce and keep it in the refrigerator to put on other things too. Thank you for the nice comment. Enjoy!

  5. Thank you so much for this recipe. I stumbled upon it after googling sake and wasabi – ingredients I was left with in the wake of a disastrous Nigella idea involving frozen prawns (should’ve trusted my instincts there…). Anyway I cooked it a week ago and I’ve been thinking about it ever since. The reduced sauce is one of the tastiest things I’ve ever put on my tongue. I’m off to make it agin now…just waiting for some brown rice to cook. Going with lightly wok-tossed pan choy on the side.

  6. *pak choy

    • Thank you Chris for the nice comment. It IS a great sauce and after serving this to some friends they will not eat teriyaki without having wasabi on the side anymore! Brown rice and pak choy sound perfect, enjoy!.

  7. Thanks for sharing this recipe. Tried it last night found the sauce too salty. Did you have to dilute it with water? Thanks!

    • Thank you for trying the recipe. It is not too salty for me or has anyone else mentioned it being too salty. I do not dilute it with water since the taste is perfect to me. I use an artisanal soy sauce that is much less salty than regular soy sauce. I’m not sure what soy sauce you used but that could make a difference. I’ve tried many of his recipes, he’s one of my favorite Japanese chefs and he’s a regular on many Japanese cooking shows. As with any sauce recipe everyone has different taste. I hope you try it again and adjust it to your taste. You can just use less soy sauce next time.

  8. Btw, have you tried his other recipes?

    • Yes I’ve tried many of his recipes. He is on Japanese cooking shows regularly and has many cookbooks. He’s one of the most famous chefs in Japan.

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