Gyoza, Japanese Potstickers

Gyoza Japanese PotstickersValentines Day and Gyoza?  I say why not?  Nothing shows your love more than feeding someone a perfectly cooked, crispy on the bottom soft and supple on the top, Gyoza dumpling.  Doesn’t that sound like a perfect Valentines Day dinner to you?  Just looking at that little package of deliciousness will make anyone smile, especially after they take that first juicy bite.

There are a few different types of Gyoza fillings I like to make at home.  The recipe I’m sharing with you is my favorite combination of ingredients and one I find myself making the most.  I grew up eating a very similar style of Gyoza that my mom would prepare for us.  Her Gyoza was the talk of the neighborhood and she was always asked to share her recipe. Of course she really didn’t have a recipe, at least not one that was written down, it was all in her head so she would have her friends come over and show them how to make her famous Gyoza.  I remember watching her make her mouthwatering Gyoza filling and rolling out the dough to make her own perfect wrappers.  I loved helping her cut out the circles with an old cup that she always used.  Such fun memories of cooking with my mom and we continue to cook together today.

Now I love having my friends over and teaching them how to make Gyoza.  They are a little intimidated at first but after watching me and making a few themselves they realize that it’s not that difficult.  I don’t make my own wrappers I buy the Gyoza wrappers at my local Asian Grocery store.  There are so many good ones out there now and it’s such a timesaver.  You can make the filling ahead of time and then assemble them right before you’re ready to eat.  I know Gyoza will definitely be on my Valentines Day menu and I hope it will be on yours too.

Ingredients:

1 pound ground pork
1 cup green cabbage, finely chopped
1/2 cup nira, garlic chives, finely chopped
1/2 Japanese large green onion (naga negi) or 2-3 scallions finely chopped
2 tablespoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon mirin
1 tablespoon sake
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon garlic, chopped
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
2 packages of gyoza wrappers
Canola or Vegetable oil for frying

For dipping sauce

soy sauce, rice vinegar and Rayu chili oil (optional)

Preparation:

1.  Combine all ingredients other than the oil in a bowl and mix well with your hands.  Mix until you see the mixture and the edges of the bowl turn slightly white.  This means the fat of the pork is melting from the warmth of your hands and a sign the ingredients are blended well.

Gyoza Japanese Potstickers Step 1

2.  Place a teaspoonful of the filling in the center of the gyoza wrapper.

Gyoza Japanese Potstickers Step 2

3.  Dampen the edge of the wrapper by dipping your finger in water and tracing the outline of the entire wrapper.

Gyoza Japanese Potstickers Step 3

4.  Bring both sides of the wrapper together and press together well until completely sealed.  I don’t pleat my Gyoza I prefer the ruffled look, It’s quicker and I think it looks better, like a ruffle on a beautiful dress.

Gyoza Japanese Potstickers Step 4

5.  Heat oil in a large frying pan.  Arrange Gyoza in rows, one behind the other, in the frying pan (this will make it easy to scoop out a row of Gyoza with a spatula when finished frying).  Fry on high heat until the bottoms become brown and crispy.  Turn the heat down to low and add 1/4 cup of water to the pan.  Quickly cover the pan and steam the gyoza on low heat until the water is gone.

Gyoza Japanese Potstickers Step 5

Gyoza, Japanese Potstickers
 
Ingredients
  • 1 pound ground pork
  • 1 cup green cabbage, finely chopped
  • ½ cup nira, garlic chives, finely chopped
  • ½ Japanese large green onion (naga negi) or 2-3 scallions finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon mirin
  • 1 tablespoon sake
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon garlic, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 2 packages of gyoza wrappers
  • Canola or Vegetable oil for frying
  • For dipping sauce
  • soy sauce, rice vinegar and Rayu chili oil (optional)
Instructions
  1. Combine all ingredients other than the oil in a bowl and mix well with your hands. Mix until you see the mixture and the edges of the bowl turn slightly white. This means the fat of the pork is melting from the warmth of your hands and a sign the ingredients are blended well.
  2. Place a teaspoonful of the filling in the center of the gyoza wrapper.
  3. Dampen the edge of the wrapper by dipping your finger in water and tracing the outline of the entire wrapper.
  4. Bring both sides of the wrapper together and press together well until completely sealed. I don't pleat my Gyoza I prefer the ruffled look, It's quicker and I think it looks better, like a ruffle on a beautiful dress.
  5. Heat oil in a large frying pan. Arrange Gyoza in rows, one behind the other, in the frying pan (this will make it easy to scoop out a row of Gyoza with a spatula when finished frying). Fry on high heat until the bottoms become brown and crispy. Turn the heat down to low and add ¼ cup of water to the pan. Quickly cover the pan and steam the gyoza on low heat until the water is gone.
  6. Serve gyoza with dipping sauce on the side. For the dipping sauce, mix a 1:2 ratio of soy sauce to rice vinegar and add a little Rayu chili oil if you like it a little spicy.

 

Serve gyoza with dipping sauce on the side.  For the dipping sauce, mix a 1:2 ratio of soy sauce to rice vinegar and add a little Rayu chili oil if you like it a little spicy.

Comments

  1. Oh yummy! Seeing your how-to photos above took me back in time, watching my own mom making mandu. And then it was my turn to help out.. I always put too much filling.. and my mom would always chide me if my mandu didn’t look perfect. As these do!

    • What a cute story! It was the same with me and my Mom 🙂 she doesn’t like making them anymore~she wants me to make them for her

  2. Gyoza for Valentine’s day? Oh YES! I always love the golden brown part at the bottom. So crispy! When we were a kid, my mom always told us to stay away from the kitchen when she was cooking. But now she will come to my house and teach me her recipes or just sent me a big pot of her cooking hehehe 😀

    • Thank you for the sweet comment Lia! That’s great you’re learning your Mothers recipes and you can teach them to your children in the future. I think It’s so important to pass on recipes.

  3. Hi Shirley
    I never cook gyoza before and your recipe makes me want to give it a try 🙂
    Thank you for sharing

  4. I’m so happy to hear that! It’s not as difficult as people think 🙂 good luck.

  5. This recipe looks great, with one exception. I like to make my own dough for pasta, bread, what have you…and I was disappointed to see that you have mentioned your Mother making the wrappers for these, but have included no recipe for those of us who avoid ‘store bought’ whenever possible. Could you post this recipe? Thanks!

  6. Thank you for your comment Jane. Unfortunately I don’t have a recipe for my Mom’s wrappers, she never used a recipe they were all in her head.

  7. I’d like to share a story, too 🙂
    Last weekend it was my first try of making them – with friends coming and everything (who I thought it was safe to try something I’ve never done before, because they don’t know Gyouza). I did everything myself, and kind of thought I had the monopol on Gyouza making, with the others just watching… well, in the middle of it (the first eight “test Gyouzas” were just ready) I had to collect a special guest from the train station, and was away for maybe 20 minutes. When we got back, all Gyouzas were beautifully (well, almost all) wrapped and my friends pleaded me to hurry up to fry them!! There was no “test Gyouza” left, of course^^ It was so funny and everyone liked the Gyouzas.

    It’s funny – I didn’t look at this page when I was researching a good Gyouza recipe. My “assembled from 3 or 4 sources” recipe still is almost exactly like on this page^^

    • Thank you for your comment Evelyn. I usually get my wrappers from a Chinese fresh noodle shop in our Intl District so they are homemade. I try to write recipes that are simple for any home cook to prepare so using ready made wrappers are easier for most people who have busy schedules.

  8. Thank you for posting this I just made them at my daughter in laws but didn’t get recipe ! Yummy

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