Sekihan (Japanese Red Bean Rice) for Project Pink

Sekihan (Japanese Red Bean Rice) for Project PinkI have always wanted to try making Sekihan, Japanese Red Bean Rice, at home.  At the beginning of October one of my friends on Twitter, Chantale, asked a group of us to make a bento for Breast Cancer Awareness month and I really wanted to participate.  I knew I probably wouldn’t make a traditional bento but when I thought about pink & food the first thing that popped into my head was Sekihan.  My second thought was Sekihan Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls), my idea of a perfect lunch.  We used to buy them at the corner Onigiriyasan (Japanese Rice Ball shop) when we lived in Tokyo.

I had never made Sekihan before but I thought this is the perfect time to challenge myself.  My hubby and I turned it into our rainy Saturday project.  He’s very good at making Onigiri too, so I asked him to help me shape them (we used an onigiri mold which makes it very easy).  I was excited when the chime on our rice cooker went off and I opened the lid to find perfectly cooked pink Sekihan.  Hubby was excited too, it’s one of his favorites.  You don’t have to make Onigiri with the Sekihan though, it’s great served warm right out of the rice cooker with a sprinkling of Goma shio.

Sekihan is usually served on special occasions in Japan and I think the month of October is a very special month.  It is the month we raise awareness about breast cancer.

Sekihan – Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

1/2 cup azuki beans
3 cups Japanese mochi (glutinous) rice
1/2 cup Japanese white rice
2 teaspoons sea salt
Goma shio (black sesame seed & salt mixture)

Preparation:

Sekihan (Japanese Red Bean Rice) for Project PinkCook the azuki beans:  Rinse beans well in water.  Boil beans in 2-3 cups of water for two minutes and drain.  Add another 3 1/2 cups of water to the pot and cook beans over high.  Once water starts to boil reduce heat to low and simmer for 20-30 minutes until beans are tender to the touch.

Drain beans in a colander with a bowl underneath to catch the liquid, you do not want to discard the liquid, this will be the liquid you use to cook the rice.

Wash the mochi rice and white rice and drain.

Add the rice and the boiling liquid to the rice cooker.  The liquid should reach the 3.5 mark on your rice cooker.  If it’s not enough liquid, add water.  (note:  if your rice cooker doesn’t have a Takikomi Gohan setting use 20% less water) Spread the red beans evenly over the rice.  Sprinkle the salt over the mixture and switch the rice cooker on.

When Sekihan is finished, you can make Onigiri or serve it immediately in bowls.  Sprinkle generously with the Goma shio.

Sekihan (Japanese Red Bean Rice) for Project Pink
Serves: 4-6
 
Ingredients
  • ½ cup azuki beans
  • 3 cups Japanese mochi (glutinous) rice
  • ½ cup Japanese white rice
  • 2 teaspoons sea salt
  • Goma shio (black sesame seed & salt mixture)
Instructions
  1. Cook the azuki beans: Rinse beans well in water. Boil beans in 2-3 cups of water for two minutes and drain. Add another 3½ cups of water to the pot and cook beans over high. Once water starts to boil reduce heat to low and simmer for 20-30 minutes until beans are tender to the touch.
  2. Drain beans in a colander with a bowl underneath to catch the liquid, you do not want to discard the liquid, this will be the liquid you use to cook the rice.
  3. Wash the mochi rice and white rice and drain.
  4. Add the rice and the boiling liquid to the rice cooker. The liquid should reach the 3.5 mark on your rice cooker. If it’s not enough liquid, add water. (note: if your rice cooker doesn’t have a Takikomi Gohan setting use 20% less water) Spread the red beans evenly over the rice. Sprinkle the salt over the mixture and switch the rice cooker on.
  5. When Sekihan is finished, you can make Onigiri or serve it immediately in bowls. Sprinkle generously with the Goma shio.

 

Azuki Bean

Comments

  1. Shirley, this is beautiful! They look perfect and incredibly savoury to eat. A gorgeous ‘pink’ onigiri and I’m so glad that you’re here, celebrating raising awareness for Breast Cancer month! big hugs to you.. : )

    • Thank you Chantale for including me! You always inspire me and your lovely smile cheers me up every day. Happy I was able to take part.

  2. you are such a natural at this blogging thing- your posts have been fab. love when the food looks amazing, clearly tastes splendid, but most importantly, has a good message behind it. this post is the embodiment of that- great one.

    • Thank you so much for the nice comment. You don’t know how much it means coming from someone as talented as you are. You have introduced so many people to me throughout the Seattle food blogging community as well, I really appreciate it.

  3. I saw your blog from the foodie blog roll and I like your recipes here.if you wont mind, I’d love to guide Foodista readers to this post. Just add the azuki bean widget at the end of this post and it’s good to go. Thanks!

  4. Thank you very much, I did

  5. Love your blog. FYI – I was born in Sweden, raised in S. Korea and now living in Seattle. I thought your background was great.

  6. Thank you! Your background sounds very interesting as well. My blog is still a work in progress and I’m learning every day. I really appreciate the nice comment :)

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  1. [...] Sekihan (Japanese Red Bean Rice) for Project Pink I knew I probably wouldn't make a traditional bento but when I thought about pink & food the first thing that popped into my head was Sekihan. My second thought was Sekihan Onigiri (Japanese Rice Balls), my idea of a perfect lunch. Goma shio (black sesame seed & salt mixture). Preparation: Sekihan (Japanese Red Bean Rice) for Project Pink Cook the azuki beans: Rinse beans well in water. Boil beans in 2-3 cups of water for two minutes and drain. [...]

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