Buta no Shogayaki, Japanese Pork Ginger

ginger pork finished dishButa no shogayaki or Japanese Pork Ginger is a classic dish that I used to eat regularly when I was living in Japan.  My fondest memory is when my now husband and I first started dating.  There was a small restaurant in my neighborhood called Umebachi and we would often meet there when we were lucky enough to have lunch together.  This place was tiny, only ten seats around a circular counter, and if you didn’t get there by noon you were in for a very long wait.

The husband (Master) and wife (Mama) team who own Umebachi did everything themselves in the most cramped and narrow open kitchen you could imagine.  I was amazed at the variety of dishes they were able to prepare in such a small space when they could barely move around each other.  Umebachi had so many of my favorites on their menu but the dish I would order over and over again was the Pork Ginger.  Master’s Pork Ginger was the perfect balance of juicy pork, sweetness from the mirin and the kick of fresh ginger.  I was lucky enough to get his recipe after we all became very close friends and, as you can imagine, it’s a very popular dish in my house now.

In Japan, Pork Ginger is usually served with shredded cabbage, rice and miso soup but I also love to serve it on top of mixed salad greens, sliced cucumbers and fresh tomatoes as an entree salad.  The leftovers make great sandwiches the next day too!

Ingredients: (4 servings)

2 Tbsp ginger juice (squeezed from freshly grated ginger)
3 Tbsp finely chopped ginger
1/4 cup sake (you can substitute sherry or dry white wine)
4 Tbsp soy sauce
4 Tbsp mirin
1 pound thinly sliced pork shoulder, loin or thin bone-in pork chops
1 Tbsp sesame oil
1 Tbsp canola or vegetable oil

Preparation:

First, to make the sauce mix the first five ingredients in a bowl and set aside.

ginger pork ingredients

Add both the sesame oil and the vegetable oil to a skillet over medium high heat.  When skillet is hot add the pork and cook on one side until pork is nicely browned.

Turn pork over and brown the other side, when pork is just about cooked through add the sauce ingredients slowly and turn heat down to low.  Simmer the pork in the sauce until pork is fully cooked and sauce thickens slightly, about 3 minutes.

Do not overcook the pork, it cooks very quick and will toughen if cooked too long.

Buta no Shogayaki, Japanese Pork Ginger
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 2 Tbsp ginger juice (squeezed from freshly grated ginger)
  • 3 Tbsp finely chopped ginger
  • ¼ cup sake (you can substitute sherry or dry white wine)
  • 4 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 4 Tbsp mirin
  • 1 pound thinly sliced pork shoulder, loin or thin bone-in pork chops
  • 1 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 1 Tbsp canola or vegetable oil
Instructions
  1. First, to make the sauce mix the first five ingredients in a bowl and set aside.
  2. Add both the sesame oil and the vegetable oil to a skillet over medium high heat. When skillet is hot add the pork and cook on one side until pork is nicely browned.
  3. Turn pork over and brown the other side, when pork is just about cooked through add the sauce ingredients slowly and turn heat down to low. Simmer the pork in the sauce until pork is fully cooked and sauce thickens slightly, about 3 minutes.
  4. Do not overcook the pork, it cooks very quick and will toughen if cooked too long.

 

Comments

  1. Oh now this is something I must try this weekend for the Mister! He is a pork lover! lol. What a lovely story about the husband and wife team of Umebachi.. Of course you would end up great friends with them! lol. How could they not love you?

    • Thank you for the sweet comment! I’m sure your husband will love this dish. We were lucky to meet so many nice people while living in Japan, when I make this dish it brings back all those good memories.

  2. So much easier than it sounds like it will be from the name; and sweet story to boot. Ginger now on shopping list!

    • Thank you for your comment. Yes, this is a great dish for those times when you are short on time, comes together real quick. Enjoy!

  3. I was imprinted with buta no shogayaki–it was probably the first lunch I had in Japan years and years ago. And the second, and third, and fourth…

    My first boss’ language skills were not too good, but he could say “buta no shogayaki” and get a really good lunch, right near the office. It was Zakuro, across the street from the American Embassy. Their preparation was a bit unusual. The meat was sliced thinner. It was served next to the shredded cabbage and accompanied by daikon oroshi with some of the ginger marinade to put on top of the oroshi.

    Since that was pretty much all he could order for lunch, it’s pretty much all we had for the first few days. So I am imprinted with that variation. Could be worse, I know. It was very good and I recommend it.

  4. Thank you for your comment. There are many variations of this dish throughout Japan and each restaurant and family has their own special recipe. This is just one version of Buta no Shogayaki. I too use the thinner meat sometimes but the thicker pork chop is usually what’s readily available here in the US.

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